(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Presidential design awards 2000"

m 



***** 







Design 



Awards 2000 






■ 






MESSAGE /PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 2000 




The White House 
Washington 

April 20, 2000 



Through the skill and creativity of designers, the dreams of our 
nation have been transformed into reality and the visions of our 
people made manifest. Many of our nation's finest design achieve- 
ments were commissioned by the federal government, and the 
quadrennial Presidential Awards for Design Excellence seek to 
recognize such achievements and the federal agencies, federal 
employees, and private designers who created them. 

The award-winning projects for this millennium year collectively 
honor America's past through outstanding preservation and res- 
toration projects, and they help us to imagine the future through 
innovative building, transportation, and space exploration projects. 
I am pleased and proud to congratulate the recipients of the 2000 
Presidential Awards for Design Excellence. Their work reflects 
the breadth and genius of American design, and their efforts have 
contributed immeasurably to the quality of life in our nation. 



7a*jk CUutojUL 




WHITE HOUSE 
MILLENNIUM COUNCIL 

Honor the Past- Imagine the Future 



PREFACE / PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 2000 



Design played a prominent role 
in ushering in the 21st century. 

Across the globe, celebrations centered on cherished architectural 
icons: the Pyramids in Giza, the Acropolis in Athens, St. Basil Cathe- 
dral in Moscow, St. Peter's Basilica in Borne, the Eiffel Tower in Paris, 
the Gateway of India in Bombay, the Opera House in Sidney, and 
the Washington Monument in Washington. Spectacular images filled 
television screens with a kaleidoscope of 4,500 years of architectural 
history a testament to the power and value of design. A glance at 
the great civilizations and governments of history reveals that they 
are remembered by outstanding design. 

Design as been integral to the success of America since the found- 
ing of the Bepublic. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson recog- 
nized the power of design to unite a disparate people into a demo- 
cratic nation. The planning and design of the new capital and its build- 
ings gave visual form to democratic ideals. During the 19th century, 
the neo-Classical designs of Federal custom houses, courthouses, 
and post offices brought pride and confidence to communities across 
the country. Federal construction projects of the Depression years 
were not simply a means for providing jobs, but a way to demonstrate 
continued faith in the country and its Government. 

As the 20th century drew to a close, President Clinton asked Ameri- 
cans what it would take to prepare for a new millennium: What values 
and heritage would we carry with us and what gifts would we give to 
the future? This millennium year award-winning projects show that 
Americans value creativity and imagination, hard work and persever- 
ance; that we respect our environment and our political and cultural 

heritage; and that we have a deep desire 
this millennium year award-winning projects to explore the unknown and expand our 

showthat Americans value creativity and imagination, universe of knowledge. The projects 

hard work and perseverance, that we respect our range from a dramatic highway that hugs 

environment and our political and cultural heritage; Glenwood Canyon over the Colorado 

and that we have a deep desire to explore the unknown Biver to a rover named Sojourner that 
and expand our universe of knowledge, traversed the rocky terrain of Mars. They 

include the magnificently restored 
Grand Central Terminal in New York City, with its new marble stair- 
case and incredibly beautiful celestial ceiling, and the Franklin Delano 
Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, DC, which honors a great man 
and President through a series of "garden rooms" punctuated with 
waterfalls, sculptures, and quotations. 



PREFACE /PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 2000 



The Federal Government is the nation's largest user of design ser- 
vices and products. As a responsible steward of public resources, the 
Government owes it to taxpayers to obtain the best design available. 
Since the early 1970s, the National Endowment for the Arts has worked 
to keep good design at the forefront of Federal activities through its 
Federal Design Improvement Program. In 1997, the General Services 
Administration offered its expertise and resources to expand advo- 
cacy for design excellence throughout the Federal Government. 
Today, the Federal Design Improvement Program and the Presiden- 
tial Design Awards are administered jointly by both agencies. 

The Presidential Design Awards are the only Governmentwide 
recognition of excellence in Federal design. Their value is both practi- 
cal and symbolic. They help provide a benchmark of what good Fed- 
eral design is and what it can achieve. As 
there are two levels of awards: federal design Presidential awards, they carry the highest 

achievement awards are awards of merit given by level of endorsement. 

the national endowment for the arts as its highest r r ne awar ds are given every four years. 

recognition of quality design, presidential awards They honor exemplary Federal achievements 
for design excellence are awarded by the president m architecture, interior design, historic pres- 
for the highest quality of design in accordance ervation, landscape architecture, urban de- 

with international standards Slgn anc j planning, engineering, graphic 

design, and product/industrial design. Pro- 
grams and policies stimulating good design also are eligible. All 
Federal employees and Federal contractors, state and local govern- 
ments, and nonprofit organizations may participate. The principal 
requirement is that the work or activity be authorized, commissioned, 
produced, or supported by the Federal Government and completed 
within the 10 years prior to the call for entries. For this round of awards, 
works had to be completed and in use between January 1, 1989, and 
January 1, 1999. 

There are two levels of awards: Federal Design Achievement Awards 
are awards of merit given by the National Endowment for the Arts as 
its highest recognition of quality design. Presidential Awards for 
Design Excellence are awarded by the President for the highest qual- 
ity of design in accordance with international standards. In this, the 
fifth quadrennial competition, four juries composed of 22 private- 
sector design experts from across the country reviewed 'VW submis- 
sions from 71 Federal agencies representing work in 46 states, the 
District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and 10 foreign 



PREFACE /PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 2000 



countries. The jury chairs were architect James Polshek (reviewing 
architecture, interior design, and historic preservation); landscape 
architect George Hargreaves (reviewing landscape architecture, urban 
design, and planning); engineer David Billington (reviewing engineer- 
ing); and graphic designer April Greiman (reviewing graphic design 
and product/industrial design). The four juries selected 35 projects to 
receive Federal Design Achievement Awards. A second jury, chaired 
by renowned architectural historian Vincent Scully, selected nine 
of these projects to also receive a Presidential Award for Design 
Excellence. 

The criteria that guided the awards juries in making their selec- 
tions were: 

PURPOSE. The undertaking must have made a contribution that 
improved the Federal Government's ability to fulfdl its mission. 

LEADERSHIP. The undertaking must have established exemplary 
design practices, standards, or guidelines that can serve as models 
for Federal and private sector design activities. 

COST. The undertaking must have been cost-efficient on an environ- 
mental and life cycle basis and have demonstrated careful design 
and planning without sacrificing performance or quality. 

AESTHETICS. The undertaking must have demonstrated aesthetic 
sensibility and have been appropriate in image, form, and context. 

PERFORMANCE. The undertaking must have demonstrated a high level 
of technical and functional proficiency in all aspects of performance. 

This book honors the 35 award-winning projects. Many of them dem- 
onstrate how good design is the result of a collaborative, interdiscipli- 
nary process, often involving citizens and consumers. They show how 
good design can help expand our creative potential and help us ap- 
preciate our built and natural environments. The award-winning 
projects and those individuals responsible for creating, administer- 
ing, and advocating them prove that design excellence can flourish in 
the Federal environment. The achievements of those honored in the 
pages that follow serve as an inspiration and guide for excellence in 
future Federal design activities. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/presidentialdesiOOunit 



JURY/ PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 2000 




Jury Members 



Vincent Scully (Chair) 

Sterling Professor Emeritus of the History of Art 

Yale University and 

Distinguished Visiting Professor 

University of Miami 



James Stewart Pblshek, FAIA 

Principal 

Polshek Partners Architects 

New York, NY 

Chair of Architecture, Historic Preservation, 

and Interior Design Achievement Jury 



David DeLong 

Professor of Architecture and 
Professor of City and Regional Planning 
Graduate School of Fine Arts 
University of Pennsylvania 
Philadelphia, PA 



FROM LEFT TO BIGHT 

FRONT ROW 
KARAL ANN MARLING 
JAMES STEWART POLSHEK 
APRIL GREIMAN 
VINCENT SCULLY (CHAIR) 
ELIZABETH SMITH 

MIDDLE ROW: 
GEORGE HARGREAVES 
DAVID P. BILLINGTON 

BACK BOW 

NOEL MAYO 

ADELE CHATFIELD-TAYLOR 

DAVID DELONG 



David P. Billington 

Professor and Director, Program 
on Architecture and Engineering 
Princeton University 
Princeton, NJ 

Chair of Engineering Achievement Jury 

April Greiman 

Principal 

Greimanski Labs 

Los Angeles, CA 

Chair of Graphic Design and Industrial/ 'Product 

Design Achievement Jury 

George Hargreaves 

Principal 

Hargreaves Associates 
Cambridge, MA 

Chair of landscape Architecture, Urban Design, 
and Planning Achievement Jury 



Karal Ann Marling 

Professor in Art History and American Studies 
University of Minnesota 
Minneapolis, MN 

Noel Mayo, FDIC IDSA 

Eminent Scholar in Art and Design Technology 
The Ohio State University 
Columbus, OH 

Elizabeth Smith 

Chief Curator 

The Museum of Contemporary Art 

Chicago, IL 

Adele Chatfield-Taylor 

President 

American Academy in Rome 

New York, NY 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD WINNERS 



U.S. CENSUS BUREAU NATIONAL DATA PROCESSING CENTER 

BOWIE, MARYLAND 



U.S. PORT OF ENTRY 

CALEXICO. CALIFORNIA 



GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL 

NEWYORK, NEWYORK 



INTERSTATE 70 

GLENWOOD CANYON, COLORADO 



MARS PATHFINDER MISSION 



FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT MEMORIAL 

WASHINGTON. DC 



NATIONAL PARK SERVICE PARK CULTURAL LANDSCAPES PROGRAM 



WESTSIDE MAX LIGHT RAIL 

PORTLAND, OREGON 



THE MAYORS' INSTITUTE ON CITY DESIGN 

WASHINGTON, DC 



Presidential Awards 
for Design Excellence 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 

U.S. Census Bureau 

National Data Processing Center 



BOWIE, MARYLAND 



Using a stainless steel tensile truss glazed system and metal flat and 
ribbed panels in a palette of white and gray, the architects created a 
sleek, airy computer and telecommunications center reflecting the 
Census Bureau's commitment to technology and desire for an open 
and efficient work environment. Window walls and large expanses of 
glass provide light- filled workspaces while minimizing the mass of 
the 130,000-square-foot, one-story building that sits in a 
park- like suburban setting. Views to the outdoors from 
offices, break areas, and corridors eliminate visual mo- 
notony. Movable partitions permit the open office spaces 
to be rearranged and the conference areas to be subdi- 
vided as needed. 

Flexibility and adaptability for computer and telecom- 
munications equipment are achieved through an acces- 
sible cable-tray system in the corridors, allowing for easy 
recabling of computer and office modules. Modules are 
on flush-raised floors two-feet deep. 

To contain construction costs, the computer modules have economi- 
cal ground-faced concrete bearing walls and a simple, lightweight joist 
roof system. Floor and ceiling materials are 
"industrial" and easy to maintain, yet human 
in scale. The building projects an image of 
openness and accessibility, although numer- 
ous protection devices concealed within the 
structure provide a high level of safety and 
security. 




i * i 



GENERAL SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATION, 
NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. 
US CENSUS BUREAU 

DAVIS BRODY BOND 

TOBEY + DAVIS 




JURY/ IT IS A SMALL BUILDING WITH A SUBTLE MONUMENTALITY ITS TRANSPARENCY IS APPROPRIATE 
TO THE BUILDING'S FUNCTION, SYMBOLIZING THE OPENNESS OF THE CENSUS SURVEY. THE DESIGN SHOWS 
THAT A MODERNIST VOCABULARY CAN HAVE A CIVIC PRESENCE; IT'S A MACHINE FOR COUNTING. 



11 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



U.S. Port of Entry 



CALEXICO, CALIFORNIA 




The border station in Calexieo, 125 miles east of San Diego, sets a 
standard of excellence as a landmark facility that vigorously rein- 
forces the ceremonial aspect of crossing an international border. 
The tent-like structures are evocative of the desert environment and 
strike a perfect balance between the monumental and the ephemeral. 
Teflon-coated fiberglass tensile roof structures cover both the open 
areas for processing vehicles and an enclosed, light- filled space for 
processing pedestrians and bus passengers. The fabric roof structures 
cut down on energy costs by diffusing sunlight into work areas and 

reflecting radiant heat. The cano- 
pied "tollbooths" where passen- 
ger vehicles are processed are 
sited so that the prevailing winds 
carry away exhaust fumes. 

The facility's exterior is a com- 
bination of concrete block, 
poured-in-place concrete, and dworsky associates 
precast concrete. Subtly varying bands of limestone form a focal wall 
inside the main building. A freestanding row of abstract monumental 
columns "marches" across the entry plaza and through the main build- 
ing, suggesting continuity of movement between the United States 
and Mexico. The project avoids the overused stylistic southwestern 
cliches. 




GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION. 
PACIFIC RIM REGION 



JURY/ THE BORDER STATION CELEBRATES VERNACULAR BUILDING TRADITIONS OF BOTH SIDES OF BORDER, 
RECALLING THE FESTIVE ATMOSPHERE OF OUTDOOR MARKETS. THERE IS A BEAUTIFULLY MODULATED QUALITY 
OF LIGHT INSIDE. THE JURY APPLAUDS THE WELCOMING, SITE-SENSITIVE QUALITY OF THE DESIGN. 




12 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



Grand Central Terminal 



NEWYORK, NEWYORK 



DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, 
FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, 
REGION 2 

METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION 
AUTHORITY 

METRO-NORTH RAILROAD 

GCTVENTURE, INC 

BEYER BLINDER BELLE 
ARCHITECTS & PLANNERS LLP 

HARRY WEESE & ASSOCIATES 

STV/SEELYE STEVENSON, 
VALUE & KNECHT 

FISHER MARANTAZ RENFRO 
STONE, INC, 

THE ROCKWELL GROUP 






For years, Grand Central Terminal was a place to avoid. Once dreary 
and even scary, it is now a visual feast accessible to all. The design 
team was challenged not simply to upgrade the famous 1913 Beaux- 
Arts train station through a careful restoration but to make critical 
changes that would add new uses without destroying the architec- 
tural character of the building. Following The Secretary of Interior's 
Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic 
Ruildings, the designers have brought the building to full, active use as 
both a major railroad station and a vibrant public space for commer- 
cial and cultural activities. 

Light once again pours into the Main Con- 
course, one of the great rooms in the country, 
through windows that were blocked and cov- 
ered in grime. The rich surfaces of Bottocino 
marble and Caen stone have been thoroughly 
cleaned and repaired. The famous Sky Ceil- 
ing has been cleaned and newly illuminated 
using fiber optic lights. A new stair was built 
on the east side. The stair was included in the 
original plans but dropped from construction 
at the last moment. Now, it provides access to 
restaurants on the balcony level and to the 
food court on the lower level. 

Today, Grand Central Terminal, once threat- 
ened with demolition, lives up to its great 
history and international renown as a trium- 
phant portal to New York. 



.num. *nu 

Jllllllllllll, ,1111111 





JURY/ THIS IS A PRAISEWORTHY SHOW OF CONFIDENCE IN A MAJOR 
CIVIC MONUMENT AND A HIGHLY PROFESSIONAL APPROACH EMPLOYING 
AN APPROPRIATELY BALANCED TEAM OF EXPERTS. ENHANCED LIGHTING 
DID NOT DETRACT FROM THE ORIGINAL HISTORIC FABRIC ANDTHE SUBTLE 
USE OF COLOR. JURORS PRAISED WHAT WAS ABSENT— SHOPPING 
CENTERS AND THE LIKE— IN THE MAIN SPACES. 







1 


° - 






Hi . 


o 








o 








o 








c 




^^ 


H 




J]Z 






hi vtx 



15 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



Interstate 70 



GLENWOOD CANYON, COLORADO 



Glenwood Canyon, carved by the fast-flowing Colorado River over 
the last 40 million years, plunges more than 2,000 feet at its deepest 
and is very narrow at the bottom. An antiquated two-lane roadway 
built in the 1930s had become a dangerous bottleneck to east-west 
travel in this part of the state. The problem was how to upgrade it to 
interstate highway standards without destroying the delicate natural 
environment. Normal cut-and-fill building methods would have ir- 
reparably damaged the canyon. Working for nearly two decades to 
overcome citizens' concerns and conflicting demands, the engineers 
designed an extraordinary highway. 

Their solution was to build a terraced, four-lane highway, with 
eastbound lanes stepped above those heading west. Much of the 
roadway is elevated on 40 bridges and viaducts with a combined length 
of more than six miles. These structures are supported on slender 
columns, painted to resemble the natural rock. Some structures soar 

as high as 80 feet above the ground. 
To avoid intruding on the trail to 
Hanging Lake, a popular scenic 
attraction, the highway sweeps 
across the river on long spans and 
disappears into two 4,000-foot- long 
tunnels. Because of the length and 
isolation of the tunnels, air quality 
and traffic are monitored from a 
four-stor\ underground control 
center nearby. All the construction was done while keeping traffic 
moving safely through the canyon with minimal delays. 

The highway is a wonder of human engineering that provides 
an aesthetically pleasing framework from which to view the canyon's 
magnificence. 




CREDITS 

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, 
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, 
COLORADO DIVISION 

COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF 
TRANSPORTATION, DIVISION OF 
HIGHWAYS 

GRUEN ASSOCIATES 

NELSON HALEY PATTERSON 
AND QUIRK 

DMJM PHILLIPS REISTER 

JOSEPH PASSONNEAU & PARTNERS 

LEIGH WHITEHEAD ASSOCIATES 

DELEUW, CATHER & COMPANY 

CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
FOR GLENWOOD CANYON 



JURY/ THE FOUR-LANE INTERSTATE HIGHWAY NOT ONLY AVOIDED FURTHER DAMAGE TO 
A BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN CANYON, IT ACTUALLY RESTORED THE NATURAL TALUS SLOPES AND 
NATURAL BANKS OF THE COLORADO RIVER. THE DESIGN PROCESS FOR THIS ENVIRONMENTALLY 
SENSITIVE AREA INCLUDED REVIEWS BY A CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND ATECHNICAL 
REVIEW COMMITTEE, AND EXTENSIVELY PUBLICIZED DRAWINGS AND MODELS OF ALIGNMENT 
ALTERNATIVES. AS A RESULT, THE PROCESS HAS BECOME A MODEL FOR THE DESIGN AND 
CONSTRUCTION OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAYS IN VALUED NATURAL LANDSCAPES. 




16 



I 



i 



%- * 




PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



Mars Pathfinder Mission 



On July 1, 1997, after a hiatus of 20 years, the United States returned 
to Mars and for the next three months people around the world 
watched and participated in the excitement as images and data were 
returned to Earth by the first-ever planetary rover. 

The Pathfinder was one of the first two projects under NASA's 
Discovery Program, a 1992 program distinguished by a strategy for 
low cost, short schedules, and focused scientific payloads to explore 
space frontiers. The Pathfinder Mission's response to this strategy was 
to co-locate a small team to facilitate daily face-to-face communica- 
tion and concurrent engineering. The team conceived a unique 
design that used direct entry into the Mars atmosphere, slowed by a 
parachute and simple solid-propellant rockets, and cushioned by 
airbags, to land a small station and a small rover on a preplanned site 
of very rocky but geologically interesting terrain. 

Beyond achieving mission objectives by 
the spectacular demonstration of functional 
performance, the mission exemplifies NASA's 
new philosophy of lower-cost planetary 
exploration without sacrificing design qual- 
ity. By focusing its design objectives, the 
mission was accomplished at less than one- 
tenth the cost of the previous mission to 
Mars 20 years earlier. 




NATIONAL AERONAUTICS 
AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION, 
OFFICE FOR SPACE SCIENCE FOR 
THE MARS PATHFINDER MISSION 
ANDTHE JET PROPULSION 
LABORATORY 





JURY/ THE PROJECT'S MULTIDISCIPLINARY, CONCURRENT ENGINEERING 
APPEARS TO BE A GREAT IMPROVEMENT OVER THE COMPARTMENTALIZED, 
SEQUENTIAL FASHION OF THE PAST. THE DIRECT ENTRY, DESCENT, AND 
LANDING SEQUENCE WERE UNIQUE AND INNOVATIVE. THE LOW-COST IS 
A RESULT FOR OTHER SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMS TO EMULATE 



19 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial 



WASHINGTON. DC 








The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is the first major national 
memorial erected in honor of a 20th-century President. It joins the 
Washington Monument and the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials as 
the fourth and last great monument provided for in the 1901 McMillan 
Plan for monument placement in Washington, DC. Encompassing 
7.5 acres, the memorial unfolds along the famous cherry tree walk of 
the Tidal Basin in West Potomac Park. 

The memorial illustrates the story of a great man and a great 
President who led the Nation through the turbulent times of depres- 
sion and World War II. The story is told in a series of four garden 
rooms representing four stages in the President's life: his early 
presidency, the depression-era social programs, World War II, and 
his death and legacy. The rooms are defined by walls of Red South 
Dakota granite, ornamental plantings, waterfalls and quite pools of 
water, inscribed quotations from Roosevelt's speeches, and bronze national capital region. 

, tvt • l l r l l • AND NATIONAL CAPITAL PARKS 

sculptures. No single element or piece ot sculpture dominates or be- 
comes a symbol of the place. The totality of the experi- 
ence is the memorial. 

Views have been selectively planned and framed 
to the Washington Monument and the Jefferson and 
Lincoln Memorials. The memorial is surrounded by 
more than 300 major trees and 3,000 shrubs to cel- 
ebrate Roosevelt's interest in conservation, forestry, and 
reforestation. Many small flowering trees attractive to 
birds represent bis avid inter- 
est in bird watching. 

At night, carefully designed ligbting trans- 
forms the space into a magical, intimate space 
of light and darkness. The Tidal Basin and 
surrounding parkland are covered in darkness 
while the waterfalls are dramatically backlit 
and the sculptures and trees are bathed in 
soft pools of light. 



C R E D I T S 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE. 
DENVER SERVICE CENTER, 



CENTRAL 

OFFICE OF LAWRENCE HALPRIN 

LEONARD BASKIN 

NEIL ESTERN 

ROBERT GRAHAM 

TOM HARDY 

GEORGE SEGAL 

JOHN BENSON 




JURY/ WHAT STARTED IN THE 1960s HAS TAKEN A LONGTIME TO EVOLVE— TO THE DISTINCT ADVANTAGE OF THE END 
RESULT. THIS MEMORIAL IS ABOUT PLACE MAKING, FORMING DISTINCT PLACES, EACH WITH ITS OWN POWER. THE WORLD 
WAR II ROOM IS ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL PUBLIC SPACES. IT HAS THE FEEL OF WAR AND THE FEEL OF A MAN WHO 
HATED WAR. THE EXPERIENCE OF THE MEMORIAL IS VERY PERSONAL. AT THE SAME TIME, THE VISITOR IS ENCOURAGED TO 
EXPERIENCE THE LARGER LANDSCAPE AS WELL. THE MEMORIAL IS POWERFUL, YET SUBSERVIENT TO THE LANDSCAPE. 



20 









"TF^f, 






. 



• 



l^r 



"■ ■ ■ 






I 



M 



1 



v--" • • 









v. ."«* 



! 






• 
1 a 




. 


■ 


i 


V 




1 


• 

* 

• 








■* 



«' « 




■■ 



OTTO 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



National Park Service 

Park Cultural Landscapes Program 




The National Park Service has a rich inventory of nationally signifi- 
cant cultural landscapes — from carriage roads to battlefields, designed 
gardens to vernacular homesteads, industrial complexes to summer 
estates. The Park Cultural Landscapes Program, established in 1988, 
provides direction and management for the protection and preserva- 
tion of cultural landscapes in our 378 national parks encompassing 
more than 80 million acres. 

The result is a comprehensive program of inventory, research, 
documentation, treatment, technical assistance, and training regard- 
ing cultural landscape preservation. To strengthen the ca- 
pacity of parks to preserve and manage their cultural land- 
scapes, the Park Service established the Olmsted Center for 
Landscape Preservation in 1992. Center staff works in part- 
nership with staffs from the national parks, universities, gov- 
ernment agencies, and private, nonprofit organizations to 
provide sustainable landscape preservation assistance. 
Through the efforts of the Park Cultural Landscapes Program, the 
National Park Service is providing national leadership in the field of 
cultural landscape preservation. The policy, standards, guide- 
lines, and technical information are used widely by other 
Federal agencies, states, nonprofit organizations, and the 
private sector. As a result, the program is having an impact 
far beyond the boundaries of the national park system. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, 
CULTURAL RESOURCE 
STEWARDSHIP AND 
PARTNERSHIPS 




JURY/ THIS ISA NEW PROGRAM OF TREMENDOUS NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE. THE PARK SERVICE HAS 
RECOGNIZED THAT DESIGNED LANDSCAPES, VERNACULAR LANDSCAPES, AND ETHNOGRAPHIC LANDSCAPES 
ARE VALUABLE, IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCES TO BE PRESERVED AND RESTORED. 




23 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



Westside MAX Light Rail 



PORTLAND. OREGON 




Westside MAX extends the Portland region's light rail line 18 miles 
west to the edge of downtown Hillsboro in the heart of Oregon's 
fast-growing Silicon Forest. It includes a three-mile, twin-tube tunnel 
through a thousand-foot-high ridge of hills. 

From the outset, the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation 
District of Oregon set out to create a transit line of architectural and 
functional distinction. Architects, engineers, and artists were brought 
together as equal partners. Creatively and intelligent lv, this team 
deftly shaped the system and eloquently gave voice to the line. The 
new MAX trains are the first low-floor light rail vehicles 
in the United States. They are specially designed for 
easy access with strollers, walkers, and wheelchairs. 
A bridgeplate emerges from the car to the platform, and 
each car has a low-floor portion not requiring any steps. 
At multiple points along the way, artists, architects, and 
engineers joined with local citizens to capture the char- 
acter of a particular area so that each of the 20 new stations reflects tri county metropolitan 
and enriches the neighboring community. At the first station on the asportation district 

00 ' OF OREGON 

new line, a trio of bronze perches- soapbox, stump, and pedestal 

r r r> J ZIMMER, GUNSUL. FRASCA 

exemplifies the historic latitude given by Portlanders to freedom of partnership 
expression for impromptu public speakers. A deep richness of his- otak. inc 
toric tradition is captured in cast bronze artifacts contributed by Na- 
tive American, Japanese, Latino, and Anglo- American citizens of Wash- 
ington County at the station in central Hillsboro. These are just a few 
of the dozens of design and art collaborations that animate the rail 
line to the delight of its 24,000 daily passengers and 15,000 new resi- 
dents of homes near the stations. All this was accomplished within 
the $944-million budget and on time. 



department of transportation, 
federal transit administration, 
region 10 



parsons brinckerhoff quade 
& douglas. inc 





■2 J 




■-i-KlTl 





JURY/ THIS IS A POWERFUL MODEL FOR OTHER CAR-ORIENTED CITIES. SHOWING HOW WELL IT CAN BE DONE AND 
HOW THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY CAN BE INTEGRATED. THE DESIGN OF THE WESTSIDE EXTENSION SEIZED THE OPPORTUNITY 
TO DO MANY THINGS AND LEVERAGEDTHE PROJECT TO ACCOMPLISH MANY GOALS. PORTLAND HAS MADE A HUGE 
COMMITMENT TO THE LARGER PLANNING VISION. THIS PROJECT IS PART OF ITS FOLLOW THROUGH 




24 



I 







E2 



i III 

- 1 ■ 



■1 



"~~L ?^' 



PRESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARD 



The Mayors' Institute on City Design 



WASHINGTON, DC 







The Mayors' Institute on City Design, established in 1986 by the 
Design Arts Program of the National Endowment for the Arts, 
educates mayors about the role of design and physical planning in 
the everyday life of a city and how to use their roles as their cities' 
chief elected officials to shape the future of their cities. Several times 
a year, the Institute brings together seven or eight mayors to meet for 
two and one-half days with a resource team of 10-12 national urban 
design and development experts. At each meeting, the mayors and 
resource team discuss specific problems facing cities 
and examine a broad range of ideas, precedents, and 
improvement strategies. Each mayor presents a case 
study of a critical issue in his or her city, and members 
of the resource team identify issues, offer suggestions, 
and discuss alternative paths towards a solution. Mem- 
bers of the resource team also make presentations re- 
garding the value of design in a city's development 
efforts. The presentations provide important information for the 
mayors on the latest thinking in urban design, sustainable develop- 
ment, consensus building, landscape design, and urban economic 
development. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence mayors 
have on the form and economic vitality of their communities. 

The Institute has helped change the face of urban America for 
the better. In more than 300 cities in each of the 50 states and Puerto 
Rico, mayors have returned home from the 
Institute as passionate and insightful urban 
designers. The results are new waterfront 
parks, creation of historic districts, attractive 
and affordable housing, energetic downtowns, 
sensitive transportation systems, and more 
human-scaled pubic buildings. 



NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR 
THE ARTS, DESIGN PROGRAM 

JOSEPH P RILEY. JR 

JAQUELINT. ROBERTSON 

ADELE CHATFI ELD-TAYLOR 

JOAN ABRAHAMSON 




JURY/ THE INSTITUTE, THROUGH ITS WORKSHOPS, HAS TOUCHED CITIES ACROSS AMERICA— LARGE AND SMALL. 
IT IS A NATIONAL PROGRAM WITH DIRECT LOCAL IMPACT. THROUGH ITS RESOURCE TEAMS, THE INSTITUTE BRINGS AN 
INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO PROJECT ANALYSIS. IT SHOWS MAYORS HOW TO ANALYZE A PROJECT IN TERMS OF 
ITS LONG-RANGE IMPACT, BOTH FISCALLY AND VISUALLY. MAYORS COME AWAY FROM A WORKSHOP WITH GREATER 
CONFIDENCE IN THEIR OWN INNATE DESIGN SENSE. ATTHE END OF THE DAY. THE INSTITUTE AFFECTS HOW AMERICA'S 
CITIES AND TOWNS GET BUILT BY EDUCATING THE BUILDERS. 



27 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD WINNERS 



ARCHITECTURE 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



GRAPHIC DESIGN 



VINCENT E. MCKELVEY FEDERAL BUILDING U.S. COURTHOUSE PLAZA 

MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



U.S. COURTHOUSE 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

U.S. PORT OF ENTRY 

POINT ROBERTS, WASHINGTON 

NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER 

MIAMI, FLORIDA 

U.S. CUSTOMS AND IMMIGRATION CENTER, 
RAINBOW BRIDGE 

NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK 

WOMEN'S MEMORIAL EDUCATION CENTER 

ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 



HISTORIC PRESERVATION 

RESTORATION OF THOMAS JEFFERSON 
BUILDING, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

WASHINGTON, DC 

U.S. COURT OF APPEALS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

REHABILITATION OF THE 
JAMES A. GARFIELD HOUSE 

MENTOR, OHIO 



ENGINEERING 

CLARK BRIDGE 

ALTON, ILLINOIS 

WOODROW WILSON MEMORIAL BRIDGE 
DESIGN COMPETITION 

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA 

SAN ANTONIO RIVER 
FLOOD CONTROL TUNNEL 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

HASTINGS GROUNDWATER 
REMEDIATION PROJECT 

HASTINGS, NEBRASKA 



PRODUCT DESIGN 



LIFE SUPPORT FOR TRAUMA 
AND TRANSPORT 



URBAN DESIGN AND PLANNING 

METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION 
AUTHORITY ARTS FOR TRANSIT 

NEWYORK, NEWYORK 



U.S. CENSUS 2000 FORM 

U.S. AIR FORCE DESIGN AWARDS PROGRAM 

AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHS: 
THE FIRST CENTURY 

VOICE OF THE HOMELESS 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

"GROWING UP DRUG FREE: 

A PARENT'S GUIDE TO PREVENTION" 

MEDICAL GUIDELINES 

"UNLIMITED BY DESIGN" 

NEWYORK, NEWYORK 

"HENRY DREYFUSS: DIRECTING DESIGN, 
THE INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER AND HIS WORK 
1929-1972" 

NEWYORK, NEWYORK 

U.S. SENATE WEB SITE 

WASHINGTON. DC 

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART WEB SITE 

WASHINGTON. DC 



28 



JURIES /FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 2000 








Wk 1 

mm 

^^4 j 





ARCHITECTURE. HISTORIC 
PRESERVATION, AND INTERIOR DESIGN 

James Stewart Polshek (Chair) 

Polshek Partners Architects 
New York, NY 

Merrill Elam 

Scogin Elam and Bray Architects 
Atlanta, GA 

Hsin-ming Fung 

Hodgetts + Fung Design Associates 
San Monica, CA 

Patricia E. Harris 

The New Synergy, Inc. 
Durham, NC 

Neil Frankel 

Frankel+Coleman 
Chicago, IL 



FROM LEFT TO RIGHT 

FRONT ROW: 

HSIN-MING FUNG 

PATRICIA E HARRIS 

JAMES STEWART POLSHEK (CHAIR) 

MIDDLE ROW 
BLAIR KAMIN 
BARTON PHELPS 
NEIL FRANKEL 

BACK ROW 
DAVID DELONG 
MERRILL ELAM 



ENGINEERING 

David P. Billington (Chair) 

Department of Civil Engineering 
and Operations Research 
Princeton University 
Princeton, NJ 

Jon Magnusson 

Skilling Ward Magnusson Bai kshire 
Seattle, WA 

Joseph Burns 

Thoi nton-Tomasetti Engineers 
Chicago, IL 

Jack Christiansen 

Structural Engineering 
Bainbridge, WA 



FROM LEFT TO RIGHT 

JACK CHRISTIANSEN 
JOSEPH BURNS 
DAVID P BILLINGTON ICHAIRI 
JON MAGNUSSON 



Barton Phelps 

Barton Phelps & Associates 
Los Angeles, CA 

David DeLong 

Graduate Program in 
Historic Preservation 
University of Pennsylvania 
Philadelphia, PA 

Blair Kamin 

Architectural Critic 
Chicago Tribune 
Chicago, IL 



30 



JURIES /FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 2000 




GRAPHIC DESIGN AND 
INDUSTRIAL/PRODUCT DESIGN 

April Greiman (Chair) 
Greimanski Labs 
Los Angeles, CA 

Dale Herigstad 

H Design, Inc. 
Hollywood, CA 



FROM LEFT TO RIGHT 

DALE HERIGSTAD 

LAURIE HAYCOCK-MAKELA 

PAULA SCHER 

KIKU OBATA 

APRIL GREIMAN (CHAIR) 

TOM HARDY 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, 
URBAN DESIGN AND PLANNING 

George Hargreaves (Chair) 

Hargreaves Associates 
Cambridge, MA 

Jennifer T. Moulton 

Office of Planning, City of Denver 
Denver, CO 



FROM LEFT TO RIGHT 

GEORGE HARGREAVES (CHAIR) 
MICHAELE PRIDE-WELLS 
JENNIFER T. MOULTON 
STUART 0. DAWSON 



Paula Scher 

Pentagram Design 
New York, NY 



Stuart O. Dawson 

Sasaki Associates 
Watertown, MA 



Laurie Haycock-Makela 

Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Bloomfield Hills, MI 



Michaele Pride-Wells 

University of Kentucky 
Lexington, KY 



Kiku Obata 

Kiku Obata & Company 
St. Louis, MO 

Tom Hardy 

Strategic Design Planning 
Stamford, CT 



31 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ARCHITECTURE 



Vincent E. McKelvey Federal Building 



MENLO PARK, CALIFORNIA 






This engaging, tactile facility composed of masonry, metal, and glass 
provides 96,600 square feet of occupiable space, including research 
laboratories, offices, support areas and a library for the Geologic 
and Water Resources Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey. These 
divisions had been housed in temporary and portable buildings. Con- 
solidation has not only improved the physical working environment 
but also has increased collaboration and cooperation among scien- 
tists and reduced operating costs through shared support space. 

The architects were faced with several challenges. The biggest 
challenge was how to preserve open space on a historically valued 
landscape while introducing a 157,500-square-foot building. This 
dilemma was complicated by a local zoning ordinance limiting over- 
all building height to 35 feet above ground. To comply with the 
ordinance, the first floor of the three-story building was put 10 feet 
below grade. The area was extensively re-graded to provide daylight 
and accessibility to this level. Trees were preserved, and the floor plate 
was divided into three segments to modulate the building mass and 
reduce visible impact. 

1 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

Another challenge was to have a masonry envelope while meeting u s geological survey 

1 1 • • J 1 A 1. J 1 J WESTERN REGION 

local seismic standards. A unique engineering solution was developed. 
Independent steel support frames mounted over the buildings struc- 
tural frame were employed, permitting the use of field-set masonry 
infill panels. This reduces the load on the structural frame, allowing 
potential seismic movement without damage. 



GENERAL SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATION. 
PACIFIC RIM REGION 



MET ARCHITECTURE 



JURY/ LABORATORY BUILDINGS USUALLY ARE COLD AND TECHNICAL; THIS ONE IS WARM AND APPROACHABLE. 
IT ESTABLISHES A STRONG FEDERAL PRESENCE WITHOUT REVERTING TO HISTORICISM. THE DESIGN DEMONSTRATES 
THE FLEXIBILITY OF THE MODERNIST IDIOM, REFLECTED HERE IN SUCH SENSITIVELY CONCEIVED DETAILS AS WINDOWS. 
CORNERS, AND OPEN ELEMENTS. 




32 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ARCHITECTURE 



U.S. Courthouse 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




JURY/ THIS COURTHOUSE ABLY CONNECTS THE PROCESS OF JUSTICE TO THE WORLD OUTSIDE, THE CURVING GLASS 
WALL IS MORE THAN A GRAND CIVIC GESTURE. THE BUILDING REPRESENTS A BREAKTHROUGH BECAUSE ITS INTERNAL 
PUBLIC SPACES ARE PROGRAMMEDTO OFFER A RANGE OF PUBLIC ACTIVITIES IT CHALLENGES HISTORICAL PRECEDENT 
RATHERTHAN SIMPLY COPYING IT THE FORM OF THE BUILDING RESPONDS INTELLIGENTLY TO A CONTEXT THAT WILL 
BECOME APPARENT WITH TIME. 



GENERAL SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATION. 
NEW ENGLAND REGION 

PEI COBB FREED & PARTNERS 
ARCHITECTS LLP 

JUNG/BRANNEN ASSOCIATES 

GRUZEN SAMTON 

COSENTINI ASSOCIATES 

LEMESSURIER CONSULTANTS 



This new U.S. courthouse is a poignant demonstration of the ability 
of architecture to reflect powerful ideas and values that teach and 
engage the public. From its prominent waterfront site overlooking 
downtown Boston and its sweeping 373-long and 88-foot high Great 
Hall of glass to the small brick dome entrance to each of the court- 
rooms, the courthouse visibly expresses the solemnity, dignity, and 
openness of our judicial system. It reflects the essence of the Ameri- 
can system of jurisprudence — that every citi- 
zen shall have equal access to the law and the 
guarantee of due process embodied in an in- 
dependent judiciary. 

Responding to its harbor site and urban 
context, the nine-story building aims for a 
balance between context and autonomy, to 
both fit in and stand out. On its street side, it 
respects and reinforces the character of the 
neighborhood with a richly fenestrated ma- 
sonry wall. On the waterside, the building stands out by making the 
entrances to all 27 courtrooms visible from the city and harbor through 
a soaring metal and glass conoid-shaped wall. 

More than half of the 4.5-acre site is dedicated to public open space. 
A two-story high arcade along the waterfront leads to Harborpark, 
a green space landscaped with trees and plants indigenous to the New 
England seashore. The space is dominated by the circular Courthouse 
Lawn the symbolic center of the courthouse and park celebrating 
equally the Federal courts and the city they serve. 





33 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ARCHITECTURE 



U. S. Port of Entry 



POINT ROBERTS, WASHINGTON 




JURY/ JURORS PRAISE THE HONEST USE OF MATERIALS. THE BUILDING ARTICULATES A BORDER, YET SEEMS 
PERMEABLE, OPEN, AND WELCOMING, IT AVOIDSTHE HARSHNESS ASSOCIATED WITH WALLS AND GATES. IT HAS 
AN ECONOMY OF MEANS, YET IS NOT SIMPLISTIC. THE RURAL SHED QUALITY IS APPROPRIATE TO THE REGION 

BUT DOESN'T PANDER TO IT 



CREDITS 

GENERAL SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATION, 
NORTHWEST/ARCTIC REGION 

THE MILLER/HULL PARTNERSHIP 



A soaring suspended canopy of steel creates a powerful gatewaj 
that welcomes and shelters users of the new port of entry at Point 
Roberts, WA. The canopy is inspired by the masts and sails of the 
boats in tbe water surrounding Point Roberts, a peninsula at the 
westernmost part of tbe 49th parallel tbat forms the border between 
the United States and Canada. The gigantic canopj slices 
through a tall wood-clad box containing private offices 
and a secure area. The box has a gently sloping roof with 
a continuous skylight to pro\ ide light to the interior and 
anchors a more dynamic open office and public infor- 
mation area made of light steel-framed elements and 
enclosed in glass. Exposed columns, beams, and other 
details have a construetivisl aesthetic to complement the 
waterfront setting. 

Point Roberts is the first station along the Canadian holder to he 
completed under the General Services Administration's Design 

Excellence Program, which has the 
goal of attracting the best talent to 
secure quality design for Federal 
facilities. The design of the facilit) 
is a model for a border station. It 
reflects Vmerica's national pride in 
being an open democratic sociclx 
while remaining sensitive to its 
regional context. 





34 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ARCHITECTURE 



National Hurricane Center 



MIAMI, FLORIDA 




To insure uninterrupted weather forecasting during tropical storms, 
this simple, efficient 25,000 square-foot facility is a "fortress" designed 
to withstand 130-mph winds without damage. Two elongated and mas- 
sive blocks of site-cast reinforced concrete 10 inches thick, with sand- 
blasted finish, house support functions. They embrace and protect 
three operations rooms and support equipment. Roll-down shutters, 
removable storm panels, and laminated impact glazing protect open- 
ings from damage by projectiles. A steel bridge 
punctuated with antennae links exterior equip- 
ment and towers with the internal operations 
core, creating a strong visual and sculptural 
element. 

In the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew in 
1990, when the National Hurricane Center was 
temporarily crippled, this building pioneered 
the first application of a new, stringent set 
of building codes for essential facilities that 
must withstand the effects of an extreme hurricane. Similar state-of- 
the art facilities will help cany the National Weather Service into the 
21st century. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. 
NATIONAL OCEANIC & 
ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, 
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE 

GOULD EVANS AFFILIATES 

HERBERT SAFFIR CONSULTING 
ENGINEER 

FLUOR DANIEL, INC 




JURY/ THE TOUGH, INDUSTRIAL VOCABULARY 
APPROPRIATELY EXPRESSESTHE URGENT PURPOSE 
OF THIS BUILDING: TO PROTECT MILLIONS OF PEOPLE 
FROM APPROACHING STORMS. THE BUILDING STRIKES 
THE RIGHT BALANCE BETWEEN BEING WELL GROUNDED 
AND PERMANENT WITHOUT BECOMING A BUNKER THE 
ARCHITECTS HAVE SKILLFULLY INTEGRATED A BRIDGE 
ELEMENTTO GIVE THE BUILDING A SPECIAL GRACE, 
LEAVENING ITS OTHERWISE HEAVY PRESENCE. 




35 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ARCHITECTURE 



U.S. Customs and Immigration Center, 
Rainbow Bridge 



NIAGARA FALLS. NEW YORK 




GENERAL SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATION. 
NORTHEAST AND 
CARIBBEAN REGION 

NIAGARA FALLS BRIDGE 
COMMISSION 

HARDY HOLZMAN PFEIFFER 
ASSOCIATES 



A brilliant 500-foot-long arc of green glass supported on stone-clad 
columns is an embracing welcome to visitors crossing the famed Rain- 
bow Bridge at Niagara Falls, NY. The arc serves as offices for the U.S. 
Customs Service and the Immigration and Naturalization Service. The 
concave facade facing Canada echoes the horseshoe 
trace of the splendid gorge and reflects the graceful 
structural composition of the bridge. Thin, vertical 
louvers of perforated metal against frit glass pay 
homage to the sweeping steel arches of the bridge and 
prevent direct sunlight from entering the building. 
The convex facade facing the American side relates more 
closely to the adjacent parkland. Horizontal trellises 
create plays of light and shadow against the building and repeal the 
rhythm of the bridge supports. Three base buildings within the space 
of the arc are made of the same Hamilton Milestone that forms the 
ledge of the Falls. 

The Rainbow Bridge is the second busiest port of entry into the 
United States after the John F. Kennedy Airport. The new facilit) 
nearly triples the number of inspection and tollbooths to 26 without 
increasing the area of the site. The facility can process more than 2,200 
vehicles per hour, with an average wait time of 30 seconds per vehicle. 
The facility is an important work of sculptural and functional 
architecture that creates a distinctive gateway. In its simplicity and 
formality, it brings composure to the jumble of man-made intrusions 
apparent in the historic landscape. 




JURY/ JURORS PRAISE THE CAREFUL USE OF MATERIALS AND COLOR TO ENGAGE THE SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE 
THE CURVED FORM AND ITS IMPLIED TRANSPARENCY ESTABLISH AN EXTRAORDINARY DIALOGUE WITH THE NEARBY 
BRIDGE AND FALLS. JURORS LIKE THE BUILDING'S SCULPTURAL FORM ANDTHE WAY IT ENGAGESTHE DRIVER. 




36 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ARCHITECTURE 



Women's Memorial Education Center 



ARLINGTON. VIRGINIA 




JURY/ THE CENTER IS A VERY SKILLFUL REVITALIZATION OF AN EXISTING STRUCTURE THAT ENHANCESTHE MEANING 
OF HISTORY AND THE NEW PROGRAM. JURORS PRAISE THE INTEGRATION OF THE GRAPHICS AND THE ARCHITECTURE 
AND ESPECIALLY LIKE THE SUBTLE TRANSITION BETWEEN OLD AND NEW. WITH LIGHT ANIMATING THE UNDERGROUND 
SPACE. THE CENTER HAS AN ENGAGING, BUT NOT OVERWHELMING. MONUMENTALITY SUITABLE TO ITS TIME. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, 
NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION 

WOMEN IN MILITARY SERVICE 
FOR AMERICA MEMORIAL 
FOUNDATION, INC 

WEISS/MANFREDI ARCHITECTS 




This memorial literally and figuratively brings light to the untold story 
of the achievements of servicewomen throughout American history. 
The dominant feature of the memorial is a 225-foot semicircular glass 
belvedere that holds large glass tablets inscribed with quotes by and 
about the women who have served in the military. Sunlight passing 
over the inscriptions creates ever-changing shadows on the marble 
wall of the center's concourse below, bringing the women's words 
into the light. The 37,000 square-foot education center is carved into 
the hillside of Arlington National Cemetery and concealed behind 
the unfinished 30-foot-high neoclassical hemicycle designed 
in 1927 by McKim Mead and White to be the ceremonial 
gateway to the cemetery. 

The concourse houses exhibits and provides access to a 
196-seat auditorium, a space containing the computer-based 
registry of names and stories of women in the military, and 
the Hall of Honor dedicated to women who died in sen ice. 
were prisoners of war, or received awards. 

At the street-level plaza, four stairways penetrate through 
archways in the hemicyle wall and rise through the interior 
concourse to the terrace atop the memorial. The memorial 
creates a visual terminus to Memorial Bridge and strength- 
ens the grand east-west axis of the Mall. 




37 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
HISTORIC PRESERVATION 



Restoration of Thomas Jefferson Building, 
Library of Congress 



WASHINGTON, DC 



THE ARCHITECT 
OFTHE CAPITOL 

ARTHUR COTTON MOORE 
& ASSOCIATES 



When the Thomas Jefferson Building opened in 1897, it both symbol- 
ized and facilitated open, democratic access to knowledge. Frescoes 
and mosaics celebrated the unity and utility of all human knowledge, 
and open public reading rooms assured that the 
collections would be shared with all Americans. 
The exuberant Italian Renaissance architecture, dis- 
tinctive dome, vibrant interior decoration, and grand 
main reading room created a national monument 
overnight. Within decades of its opening, however, 
the building had become too small to accommo- 
date the constantly growing staff and collections. 
Partitions, suspended ceilings, air-conditioning 
ductwork, and electrical wiring were installed to cre- 
ate offices in corridors, corner pavilions, and 
galleries overlooking the Great Hall. Dropped ceil- 
ings hid murals and decorative paintings. All of 
this compromised the beauty and integrity of the building. 

Following a 12-year restoration and upgrade, the building can now 
efficiently continue to serve visitors and the scholar!} public in the 
21st century. Three new reading rooms allow researchers to have ad- 
equate space to use the Library's incomparable Asian, African and 
Middle Eastern, European and Slavic collections. A new visitor's cen- 
ter welcomes those who come to see the Library's exhibitions and to 
view the glorious splendors of the restored public spaces of one of the 
most beautiful public buildings in the country. 




3 

1 


f^m 




. ■ 

. W' 1 


); g£ 1 'f 




JURY/ THIS PROJECT IS AN EXEMPLARY APPROACHTO 
THE RESTORATION OF INTERIORS OF MAJOR SIGNIFICANCE. 
JURORS PRAISE THE DESIGN FOR RECAPTURING MAJOR 
INTERIOR SPACES AND TRANSFORMING THEM INTO WELL- 
USED PUBLIC AREAS. THE PUBLIC, WHICH ONCE IGNORED 
THE BUILDING, NOW EMBRACES IT. THE PROJECT SHOWS 
HOW WELL POLYCHROMATIC TREATMENTS CAN WORK IN 
A CITY KNOWN FOR ITS MONOCHROMATIC EXTERIORS. 




38 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
HISTORIC PRESERVATION 



U.S. Court of Appeals 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




JURY/ THIS PROJECTWAS MUCH MORE THAN COSMETIC; IT ACHIEVED A MAJOR SEISMIC STABILIZATION THAT 
WAS CRITICAL TO THE SURVIVAL OF A NOTED WEST COAST LANDMARK. THIS WAS DONE WITHOUT SACRIFICING THE 
ORIGINAL HISTORIC FABRIC. A NEW ATRIUM HOUSING A LAW LIBRARY AND OFFICES INTEGRATES INTO THE BUILDING 
IN A WAYTHAT CLEARLY EXPRESSES ITS CONTEMPORARY ORIGINS WHILE PRESERVING THE "LEGIBILITY" OFTHE 
BUILDING'S ORIGINAL HISTORICAL QUALITIES. 



GENERAL SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATION, 
PACIFIC RIM REGION 

SKIDMORE OWINGS 
& MERRILL LLP 




While this opulent Beaux-Arts style building was one of the few 
downtown buildings to survive San Francisco's 1906 earthquake, it 
suffered extensive damage in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and 
was closed. While the four-story, 350,000-square foot building was 
originally designed as a Federal courthouse and Main 
Post Office, the U.S. General Services Administration 
(GSA) undertook a comprehensive three -year program 
of renovations, adaptive reuse, and seismic retrofit to 
update it for use solely by the U.S. Court of Appeals. The 
GSA preserved and restored historic features while up- 
grading the structure and major systems to a modern 
level of quality and performance, including state-of-thc 
art communications, HVAC, and electrical systems; enhanced work 
environments; and accessibility required by the Americans with Dis- 
abilities Act. A 45,000 square-foot addition housing a new law library; 
offices, and support spaces was inserted in the central court- 
yard atrium. The new atrium is a luminous space whose 
elegantly modern design and materials speak of the late 20th 
century yet connect to the past in real and poetic ways. To 
protect the building from future earthquakes, the GSA used 
innovative "base isolation" technology to significantly reduce 
the force transmitted to the structure during a tremor. 




39 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
HISTORIC PRESERVATION 



Rehabilitation of the 
James A. Garfield House 



MENTOR, OHIO 




From his front porch, James A Garfield delivered the renowned and 
compelling speeches that resulted in his election as the 20lh Presi- 
dent of the United States and changed the course of Presidential cam- 
paigning in American history. Named "Lawnfield" by reporters, the 
farm in Mentor, Ohio, purchased by Garfield in 1876 evolved into a 
political home base and, following Garfield's assassination in 1881, 
the site of the country's first Presidential memorial library. 

The rehabilitation project was guided by a General 
Management Plan approved by the National Park Ser- 
vice that called for significant portions of the main house 
to be restored to reflect its use both during the President's 
lifetime and as a home for his widow and children. The 
landscape plan restored the site to the 1886-1899 farm. 
Through extensive research and documentation, and 
with the help of many specialists, this site, with its 
collection of original family objects, is one of the most 
accurately and completely furnished 19th century 
Presidential sites. 



JURY/ GIVEN THE NEED TO RESTORE THIS PRESIDENTIAL HOME, JURORS FELT THIS PROJECT REPRESENTED A HIGH 
LEVEL OF ACCOMPLISHMENT THEY PRAISED THE DILIGENT DOCUMENTATION THAT FORMED THE BASIS FOR THE WORK 
BECAUSETHE PUBLIC HAS AN ENORMOUS INTEREST IN PRESIDENTIAL SITES, THIS IS FEDERAL MONEY WELL SPENT 




CREDITS 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, 
DENVER SERVICE CENTER 
AND HARPERS FERRY CENTER 

JAMES A, GARFIELD NATIONAL 
HISTORIC SITE 

WESTERN RESERVE 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

VAN DIJK, PACE. WESTLAKE 
ARCHITECTS 




40 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



U.S. Courthouse Plaza 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 




CREDITS 

GENERAL SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATION, 
GREAT LAKES REGION 

MARTHA SCHWARTZ, INC 



Earth mounds, logs, and jack pine — symbols of Minnesota's cultural 
and natural history — are the design elements for the 50,000-square- 
foot plaza of the new U.S. courthouse in downtown Minneapolis. 
Located over an underground garage, the plaza had to be designed 
using lightweight materials in containers sitting on the plaza. The 
design also had to accommodate the extremely cold winter weather in 
Minneapolis, a condition made even more severe by the underground 
garage as cold air could easily reach and harm plant roots from below. 

The main objectives for the plaza design were to serve as a transi- 
tion from the new, modern Federal courthouse to the Romanesque- 
style Old City Hall across the street and to provide a memorable and 
inviting civic space that people would use. The earth mounds are the 
main element that gives form to the plaza. They suggest a Minnesota 
field of glacial drumlins or a range of low mountains. Ranging in height 
from three to nine feet, the tear-shaped 
mounds are planted with jack pine, a small, 
stunted pioneer species common in 
Minnesota's boreal forests. The placement of 
the mounds in an east/west direction and the 
use of blue striped paving patterns guide pe- 
destrians through the plaza and to the front 
door of the courthouse. The log benches evoke 
images of the great timber forests that attracted 
immigrants to Minnesota and were the basis 
for the local economy. 

Minnesota's strong change of seasons is reflected in the plaza. Each 
spring and summer the mounds come alive with perennials. In win- 
ter, the heavy snows heighten the sculptural effect of the mounds. 





JURY/ COOL! THIS IS AN ABSTRACT EXPRESSION OF MINNESOTA. IT COULD BE NOWHERE 
ELSE. DEALING WITH ISSUES OF SECURITY AND ENTRANCE INTO FEDERAL BUILDINGS IS 
DIFFICULT. THIS PROJECT IS A VERY CREATIVE NARRATIVE ABOUT MINNESOTA AND ABOUT A 
FEDERAL COURTHOUSE IN A LANGUAGE THAT DOESN'T PANDER TO EASY SOLUTIONS FOR THE 
FUNCTIONAL ENTRY SECURITY ISSUES. YOU CANNOT TELL THAT THE ENTRANCE IS CONTROLLED. 
FOR THE 95 PERCENT OF THE PEOPLE WHO WILL NEVER GO INTO THE BUILDING, THE PLAZA IS 
A WONDERFUL PIECE OF URBAN SCULPTURE FORTHEMTO ENJOY 



41 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ENGINEERING 



Clark Bridge 



ALTON, ILLINOIS 





Rising from the Mississippi River, two 283-foot pylons identify the 
new Clark Bridge at Alton, [L.The concrete pylons on the centerline 
of the deck are each lopped with ;i stainless steel saddle that allows 
the cable stays to be continuous and attached from deck edge to deck 
edge rather than at the top of the pylon. This eliminates tensile forces 
in the pylons and improves the efficiency of the stays 1>\ maximizing 
their slope relative to the deck. The stays, pylons, and deck form a 
series of triangles, a very stable configuration that engi- 
neers have used for centuries. To prevent disruption of 
navigation in the river, the 4,620-foot bridge was built by 
the balanced cantilever method, alternating construction 
from one side to the other side of the pylon. 

Since its completion, the bridge has had a large impact 
on the surrounding towns. Not only has it boosted eco- 
nomic development, it has become a source of civic pride 
and is actively promoted as a tourisl attraction. 



DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. 
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION. 
MIDWEST RESOURCE CENTER 

HANSON ENGINEERS. INC 

FIGG ENGINEERING GROUP 



JURY/ THIS ELEGANT STRUCTURE ISTHE FIRST THREE-SPAN, CABLE-STAYED, SINGLE PYLON, COMMON "SADDLE" 
BRIDGE IN THE WORLD THE TWO PLANES OF CABLES PROVIDE TORSIONAL STABILITY TO THE DECK AND CREATE A 
STRIKING VISUAL IMPRESSION. CONSTRUCTION COSTS WERE REASONABLE ANDTHE BRIDGE WAS COMPLETED ONLY 
ONE MONTH BEHIND SCHEDULE IN SPITE OF THE CATASTROPHIC 1993 FLOOD THAT CRIPPLED MUCH OF THE AREA 
AROUNDTHE SITE DURING CONSTRUCTION. 




42 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ENGINEERING 



Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge 
Design Competition 



ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA 




A series of sweeping V-shaped piers will carry the new 12-lane 
Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge across the Potomac River just 
south of Washington, DC, in historic Alexandria, VA. The graceful 
and economical design was selected in an innovative national design 
competition that is a model for high profile, federally-funded bridges 
throughout the country. 

The competition was undertaken to produce a 

world-class design that befits the bridge's role as a 

gateway to the Nation's Capital. The bridge is the 

only one in the country owned by the Federal 

Government. The new bridge had to meet the needs 

of the next century while respecting the heritage of 

the region. A general request for proposals was made, 
and the initial field of seven design teams was narrowed to four final- 
ists. Each was allowed to submit up to two concepts. The finalists dis- 
played enormous creativity and thoughtfulness in producing a total Maryland division 

of seven design concepts. The concepts, submitted anonymously, were Maryland state highway 

, ,, . . . r . . . . administration 

assessed trom a wide variety ot perspectives, hour advisory commit- 

... ... . ii- POTOMAC CROSSING CONSULTANTS 

tees reflecting citizen, historic, construction, and technical concerns 

PARSONS TRANSPORTATION GROUP 

met numerous times over three months. Guided by advisory commit- 
tee reports and their own professional perspectives, 
a 15-person jury composed of leading local officials, 
distinguished architects and urban planners, and 
top bridge engineering experts from Federal and state 
transportation departments, unanimously selected 
the winning design. 



DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, 
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, 




JURY/ THIS DESIGN COMPETITION REPRESENTS A NEW APPROACH TO THE PROCESS OF ACHIEVING SUPERIOR 
DESIGNS FOR MAJOR BRIDGES INTHE UNITED STATES, THIS PROCESS PRODUCED A VARIETY OF FINE DESIGNS 
AND AWINNING ENTRY NOTABLE FOR ITS STRIKING AESTHETIC APPEAL AND ECONOMICAL CONSTRUCTION PLAN, 
THE CONTEST ALSO GENERATED SUBSTANTIAL PUBLIC INTEREST AND PROFESSIONAL PRAISE. 




43 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ENGINEERING 



San Antonio River 
Flood Control Tunnel 



SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 




JURY/ THE SUCCESS OFTHE PROJECT GOES BEYOND TECHNICAL EXCELLENCE TO INCLUDE SENSITIVELY DESIGNED 
INLET AND OUTLET AREAS THAT SERVE AS PUBLIC PLAZAS RATHER THAN EYESORES. RECIRCULATION FEATURES 
IMPROVE THE WATER QUALITY OF THE RIVER AS IT MEANDERS ALONG THE DOWNTOWN RIVERWALK. THIS PROJECT 
EXEMPLIFIES HOW AN INNOVATIVE ENGINEERING SOLUTION CAN RESULT IN AN AESTHETIC AND ECONOMIC SUCCESS. 




The San Antonio River Tunnel is designed to protect the downtown 
area by diverting floodwaters underneath the city. I sing the principle 
of an inverted siphon, the 24-foot, 4-inch wide tunnel catches up to 
three million gallons of water a minute from an overflowing San 
\ntonio River and carries the water 3. 1 miles under the eit\ where it 
is safely released hack into the river through an outlet located south 
of downtown. The inlet and outlet facilities are landscaped to create 
park-like settings to blend in with adjacent neighborhoods. 

The project also improves the water quality in the ri\er. Water recir- 
culation in the tunnel increases the flow along the famous Riverwalk, 
thereby reducing the growth of algae and making the water cleaner. 
The original proposal to widen areas of the river and 
deepen it bv 10 feet to prevent flooding would have cost 
twice the SI I 1.1 million project cost and destroyed the 
Riverwalk. In its first lest, the tunnel more than paid for 
itself in preventing the loss of human life and propcrh 
damage from a record torrential rain that dumped a foot 
of water in one day on the parched city. 




DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE. 
ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
FORT WORTH DISTRICT 

SAN ANTONIO RIVER AUTHORITY 

PARSONS. BRINCKERHOFF. 
QUADE & DOUGLAS. INC 

FRANK J DILLARD 
& ASSOCIATES. INC 

CH2M HILL 

CARTER AND BURGESS. INC 

HDR SIMPSON 

JAMES E KEETER 

ENSR CORPORATION 

FUGRO-MCCLELLAND. INC 



44 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
ENGINEERING 



Hastings Groundwater 
Remediation Project 



HASTINGS, NEBRASKA 



DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE. 
ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, 
KANSAS CITY DISTRICT 

URS GREINER WOODWARD CLYDE 



Waste practices during operation of the Blaine Naval Ammunition 
Depot resulted in six-square miles of contaminated groundwater. 
Trichloroethylene, a chlorinated solvent and carcinogen, was used to 
clean mechanical equipment and was then discharged to the ground 
surface near the production buildings. The chemicals 
migrated downward through the soil and eventually 
entered the drinking water aquifer below. 

Historically, restoration of chlorinated solvent ground- 
water contamination has been costly and only moder- 
ately effective. This project successfully applied two 
innovative technologies, air sparging and in situ bio- 
remediation, to reduce the concentration of trichloreth- 
ylene from 5,000 parts per billion to below the drinking 
water standard of five parts per billion. 

The successful results of this project can be applied 
to the worldwide problem of chlorinated solvent con- 
tamination, which is the most common groundwater pol- 
lutant. With the use of these in situ technologies, lower 
clean up costs and reduced clean up time will save millions of dollars 
on remediation projects while preserving the natural environment 
and resources of the area. 





JURY/ THIS FORMER MAJOR MUNITIONS SITE, WITH A SERIOUSLY CONTAMINATED AQUIFER, IS BEING VERY 
ECONOMICALLY CLEANED TO RESTORE THE NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT OF THE SURROUNDING FARMS 
AND COMMUNITY THE INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES USED TO CLEAN SIX-SQUARE MILES OF CHLORINATE-SOLVENT 
CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER HAVE POTENTIAL NATIONWIDE APPLICATION TO RESTORE CLEAN WATER SUPPLIES. 




45 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
PRODUCT DESIGN 



Life Support for Trauma and Transport 





When every second counts, the Life Support for Trauma and Trans- 
port (LSTAT) is there. The LSTAT is a self-contained, mini-intensive 
care unit in a stretcher. This portable, integrated intensive care system 
puts hospital-grade medical care where it is needed most at the site 
of injury. The result is increased survivability rates by 
reducing the time to deliver life saving medical care. 

The LSTAT leverages aerospace materials, informa- 
tion processing, and systems integration technologies 
to provide comprehensive trauma treatment in a pack- 
age sized for evacuation vehicles. The LSTAT is capable 
of autonomous function with sufficient batten power for a minimum 
of 60 minutes of operation and can accept external power from both 
standard AC and DC sources for longer term use and recbarging. All 
patient medical data are recorded onboard the unit and can be for- 
warded to the hospital or trauma center via data links. The LSTAT is 
modular and can be upgraded as new treatment technologies become 
available. 

The LSTAT takes trauma care into the 21st century. The 
project's holistic approach to problem solving serves as a 
model for other Federal design projects. Further- 
more, the LSTAT solution could be readib 
adaptable to the private sector for emergency 
medical treatment. 



CREDITS 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE. 
US ARMY WALTER REED ARMY 
INSTITUTE OF RESEARCH 

NORTHROP GRUMMAN 
CORPORATION 

INTEGRATED MEDICAL 
SYSTEMS. INC. 



JURY/ THE LSTAT PROJECT IS AN EXCELLENT APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN TO ADDRESS AN UNMET 
NEED IN CRITICAL CARE FIELD TRAUMA SITUATIONS. THE DESIGN APPROACH CONSIDERED THE TOTAL CRITICAL CARE 
FIELD "EXPERIENCE," RESULTING IN A NEW MEDICAL SYSTEMS SOLUTION RATHER THAN SIMPLY A PRODUCT FOR 
MEDICAL TRANSPORT. THE CONCEPT IS UNIQUE AND HAS BEEN THOUGHTFULLY DESIGNEDTO ADDRESS A DIVERSE SET 
OF APPLICATIONS AND ENVIRONMENTS 




46 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
URBAN DESIGN AND PLANNING 



Metropolitan Transportation Authority 
Arts for Transit 



NEW YORK CITY 




JURY/ THIS PROGRAM IS A CELEBRATION FOR THE REGENERATION OF A CRITICAL SYSTEM WITH A STRONG 
DESIGN HERITAGE. ARTS FOR TRANSIT USES DESIGN AS A TURNAROUND STRATEGY IT IS INCREMENTAL, YET 
COMPREHENSIVE— CELEBRATING AND DISTINGUISHING INDIVIDUAL NEIGHBORHOODS. THE PROGRAM ENHANCESTHE 
DAY-TO-DAY LIFE OF A BROAD RANGE OF PEOPLE AND ECONOMIC GROUPS. ITTRANSFORMS A SYSTEM THAT— WHILE 
A NECESSITY FOR MANY— HAD BECOME VERY THREATENING INTO ONE OF CELEBRATION OF NEWYORK'S HUMANITY. 




DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, 
FEDERALTRANSIT 
ADMINISTRATION, REGION 2 

METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION 
AUTHORITY 

MTAARTS FOR TRANSIT 

MTA NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT 
CAPITAL PROGRAM 

MTA LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD 
CAPITAL PROGRAM 

MTA METRO-NORTH RAILROAD 
CAPITAL PROGRAM 



The much-publicized turnaround of New York City is inex- 
tricably intertwined with the equally dramatic turnaround 
of the city's transportation network. In 1982, the Metropoli- 
tan Transportation Authority (MTA) began a multibillion- 
dollar program to restore the city's transit infrastructure. A 
key component of the MTA's far-reaching renewal program 
is Arts for Transit, which directs and oversees the MTA's 
aesthetic and architectural character. Arts for Transit's advocacy for 
quality design has resulted in a set of station design guidelines based 
on the subway system's original architectural philosophy. As the 
artistic eye of the MTA, Arts for Transit has been the driving aesthetic 
force behind the design elements, from railings to 
vending machines to new subway cars. 

In addition, MTA created a Permanent Ait Program 
to incorporate works of art into projects. To date, 65 
works have been installed. Although differing in style, 
scale and media, tbese works share a unifying aim: to 
create an aesthetically pleasing visual identity for each 
station, with customers attaching proprietary recogni- 
tion. The art projects are viewed by the MTA not as a 
"luxury" expense but as integral components of the ( Capital Program. 
Over the past few years, MTA ridership has risen sharply. The 
MTA believes that Arts for Transit is helping to attract and retain 
customers. 




47 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



U.S. Census 2000 Form 




"Why can't we make a simple form?" These words by Congressman 
Harold Rogers in 1995 fueled a bold new design initiative to improve 
the look and function of the 2000 U.S. Census form. 

The challenge was enormous. How to use design to get 120 million 
households to open, fill-in, and return the form. The package had to 
meet five major objectives: (1) create a new graphic 
identity, (2) compete effectively with junk mail, (3) be 
user friendly and easy to understand regardless of 
education or ethnic background, (4) be readable by the 
optical scanners, and (5) appear and be cost efficient. 
The methodology for achieving these goals was 
adapted from the best practices of the private sector in- 
formation design and packaging profession: field-based 
design and testing. The design team created prototypes and tested 
them with the general public. Feedback from these tests formed the 
basis for design changes and refinements. In this way, the team co- 
designed the new form with its users. The graphic designers also 
worked side-by-side with writers to create simple. vet elegant, 
form language that all Americans would understand. 

The Census Bureau worked with the design team to create a 
new management struct ure. An oversight committee, which had 
representation from every major department within the Bureau, 
met regularly to debate changes and developments in the re-design 
process. This structure encouraged constructive participation and dis- 
couraged interdepartmental competition common in public agencies. 
The result was a direct-mail package that was approved hv Congress 
and accepted hv a broad range of Americans in extensive testing. 




DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. 
U S CENSUS BUREAU 

TWO TWELVE ASSOCIATES. INC 

SYLVIA HARRIS DESIGN PLANNING 



JURY/ THE USE OF PLAIN LANGUAGE. CLEAR ORGANIZATION, 
TWO COLORS, AND A LARGE AND FRIENDLY FONT CREATES A LESS 
INTIMIDATING CENSUS FORM AND SUCCESSFULLY HUMANIZES AND 
CLARIFIES THIS IMPORTANT FEDERAL DOCUMENT. A CENSUS FOR 
SOME AMERICANS SUGGESTS SURVEILLANCE AND LOSS OF 
PRIVACY THIS FORM SUGGESTS INCLUSIVENESS: "BE COUNTED!' 



p" « 


-_ .--.- 


| ! I 




1 




1 —United States SJ l^7T=i. — 

1 Census 








DmiKehMiu) n ji i - i-ii .i 




Start H 


f I 





• =.-™-cr.-z 



I 



48 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



U.S. Air Force Design Awards Program 




JURY/ THE AIR FORCE IS COMMENDED FOR ESTABLISHING A COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN AWARDS PROGRAM TO 
RECOGNIZE EXCELLENCE ANDTHE IMPORTANCE OF GOOD DESIGN TO ITS MISSION. THIS RECOGNITION EFFORT SERVES 
AS AN IMPORTANT VEHICLE IN CALLING ATTENTION TO THE ROLE OF DESIGN IN ALL FACETS OF USAF OPERATIONS. 



For 24 years, the U.S. Air Force Design Awards Program has served 
as a vehicle to communicate and foster a commitment to quality 
facilities and installations. Through a juried competition, the program 
identifies outstanding examples of design quality. Each year 120-140 
entries are received in seven award categories: planning and design 
guides, housing community plans, design concepts, interior design. 
landscape design, facilities, and family housing. 

To date, the Air Force has honored 134 completed facilities, 100 
concept projects, 46 planning and landscape architecture projects, 
and 41 interior design projects. These award-winning projects help to 
establish design and construction benchmarks for the department and 
serve as models of design leadership for other Federal departments 
and agencies. 

A brochure featuring the winning entries is published each \ear 
and is an important tool in educating Air Force personnel and its 
private sector partners in the principles of design excellence. 



CREDITS 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, 
US AIR FORCE, CENTER FOR 
ENVIRONMENTAL EXCELLENCE 



49 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



American Photographs: The First Century 



American Photographs: The First Century lakes the reader* back to the 
1840s when new photographic media look the country by storm. Within 
weeks after the first daguerreotypes were made in America, photogra- 
phy studios opened across the Nation. Since then, a camera always 
seems to be present to record history in the making. Seventy-nine 
color plates are supplemented by more than a 100 four-color images. 

A deliberate effort has been made to mix familiar and lesser- known 
photographers, styles of work, and a variety of processes in order to 
explore ideas about the influence of photography in America during 
the years from 1839 to 1939. 

The typography is carefully crafted, and information about the pho- 
tographs is easily communicated. The content of the book is succinct. 
Il is divided into three major sections: essay, plates, and catalogue. 
The catalogue section is unusual. It includes informative commentar- 
ies on individual photographers and their work, bringing recognition 
to many whose efforts are little known. 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION. 
NATIONAL MUSEUM 
OF AMERICAN ART 



JURY/ THE DESIGN OF THE FIRST CENTURY IS SIMPLE, ELEGANT AND UNOBTRUSIVE, ALLOWING THIS UNUSUAL 
COLLECTION OF 19TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS TO STAND OUT THE PRODUCTION VALUE — PRINTING, COLORS, AND 
PAPER STOCK— IS OF VERY HIGH QUALITY THIS BOOK GOES WELL BEYOND A BASIC STANDARD AND ACHIEVES AN 
APPROPRIATE DESIGN FOR AN OUTSTANDING COLLECTION OF AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHS. 




50 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



Voice of the Homeless 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 




JURY/ BY PUBLICLY ELEVATING THE WORDS OFTHE HOMELESS, THIS PROJECT EMPOWERS THE HOMELESS 
TO EXERCISE A PUBLIC VOICE, BOTH AS INDIVIDUALS AND AS A SOCIO-ECONOMIC COMMUNITY AS THE RESIDENTS 
OFTHE MISSION LEARN TO USE INTERACTIVE, DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY THE EXECUTION OFFERS A WONDERFUL 
TYPOGRAPHICAL DESIGN, YET IT RAISES SERIOUS QUESTIONS ABOUT THE RELATIONSHIP OF HIGH DESIGNTO 
DRAMATICALLY DIFFICULT EXPERIENCES OFTHE HOMELESS. 



CREDITS 

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR 
THE ARTS, DESIGN PROGRAM 

BJ KRIVANEK ART + DESIGN 




"Voice of the Homeless" is a public design installation that seeks 
to humanize the Union Rescue Mission, located on Ski Row in 
downtown Los Angeles, by providing a collective and individual, 
permanent and extemporaneous voice for the homeless community. 
The project consists of two elements: an ''orientation rotunda" and 
an "electronic statement." The orientation rotunda is a circular frieze 
of inscriptions on the ceiling of the Mission. The inscriptions are 
composed of nouns/adjective/verbs in English and Spanish derived 
from in-depth interviews with residents exploring their feelings. 
The encircling frieze engages a resident to stand al the 
center of the space, selecting words to form a personal 
statement about his or her own reality. 

The electronic statement is an interactive electronic 
sign hung on the outside of the building facing the 
corporate skyline on a structure that resembles a cross. 
The electronic horizontal bar of the sign transmits 
statements from the residents as the) learn to use digital technology 
in vocational training computer programs provided by the Mission. 




51 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



Growing Up Drug Free: 

A Parent's Guide to Prevention 




This 46-page booklet takes science-based information about drugs 
and presents it in a format that is easy to read and understand and is 
visually engaging. The design team involved parents in creating this 
new edition of "Growing Up Drug Free." From initial focus groups 
where parents were asked what problems they struggle with most 
in regard to their children and drugs to feedback sessions where they 
gave input on the copy and design of the guide, parents were an in- 
trinsic part of building the content of this publication. 

Many parents in the focus groups said that they did not know what 
drugs look like and, therefore, would not be able to identify them 
even if they saw them in their kids' rooms. While normally the design- 
ers would have relied on staged photography, the 
U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency permitted them to 



CREDITS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 

photograph confiscated drugs, the first lime this has safe and drug free school 

PROGRAMS 



been permitted for a publication. 

Colorful and potent illustrations fill the booklet. 
They were done by a diverse group of children: teens 
in prison in New Jersey (many for drug-related crimes), 
pre-teens from a privileged private school, middle class 
children in suburban Westchester, NY, and pre-teens 
in an after-school art program in the South Bronx. 
Each group was given the same assignment: to draw 
their vision of a world without drugs. The drawings 
that emerged show incredibly varied images of hope, 
renewal, inspiration, and real reflection. 



PARTNERSHIP FOR 

A DRUG-FREE AMERICA 

BIG DUCK STUDIO 



JURY/ WHILE THIS IMPORTANT PUBLICATION HAS DESIGN FLAWS, PARTICULARLY IN TYPE CHOICES, ITS ART DIRECTION 
DESERVES SPECIAL MENTION. THE BOOKLET IS ILLUSTRATED BY A VARIETY OF CHILDREN. THESE ILLUSTRATIONS CONNECT 
THE READER TO THE SUBJECT MATTER WITH WARMTH AND HUMANITY. MAKING THE PLEA FOR DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES 
EVEN MORE ELOQUENT. 







timm 


Ni~ 


^O 




O-aft 

* 


Mai Hon: 




SEa? 


*»**- 


*>.(.•.«..* 




o. 


s 


UUik 


= 


|!~L 




t*1\ tw NlMIl 


■M**£-£ 


sxr* 






52 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



Medical Guidelines 




JURY/ THE BOOKS AND BOOKLETS CONTAINED IN THIS SERIES ARE WELL ORGANIZED, APPROPRIATELY STRUCTURED, 
AND CONVEY INFORMATION IN A CLEAR, CONCISE MANNER. THE SENSITIVITYTO TYPOGRAPHICAL DETAIL AND ATTENTION 
TO CRAFT ARE VERY EVIDENT AND SUPERIOR TO THE LEVEL EXHIBITED BYTOO MANY GOVERNMENT AGENCIES. 



El control del 
dolor causado 
por el cancer 



Managing 
Cancer Pain 




The Medical Guidelines cover common conditions that affect large 
numbers of people and are treated in various ways by physicians and 
other caregivers. Expert panels of physicians, nurses, and other 
caregivers using scientific evidence developed the 24 guidelines. They 
identify the most cost-effective treatments and management 
strategies for each condition. 

The issuing agency — the Agency for Health Care Policy and 
Research recognized that the guidelines needed to be cred- 
ible and presented in attractive, easy-to-use formats if they 
were to be accepted and used by a diverse audience ranging 
from physicians to healthcare professionals and consumers. 
Each guideline, therefore, was produced with a specific audi- 
ence in mind. For example, the clinical practice guide is a book 
containing an in-depth discussion of the panel's rec- 
ommendations for physicians. Pertinent parts of the book are 
excerpted in a quick-reference booklet for providers in day- 
to-day clinical practice. A brochure in both English and Spanish 
is geared to patients and family members. 

The same typeface and illustrations are used in all the guides 
so that they form an identifiable series. Printing in just two 
colors contained costs. The consumer guides were tested by 
focus groups, and both design and content were revised to 
reflect comments. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
AND HUMAN SERVICES, 
AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE 
POLICY AND RESEARCH 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 




53 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



''Unlimited by Design'' 



NEWYORK, NEWYORK 




JURY/ THE EXHIBITION DESIGN AND PRINT MATERIALS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLIMENT ITS FOCUS: ACCESSIBILITY. 
THE GRAPHICS PROGRAM MAKES THE INFORMATION LEGIBLE, NOT ONLYTHROUGH APPROPRIATE USE OF TYPOGRAPHY 
BUT WITH ILLUSTRATIONS THAN CAN BE EQUALLY UNDERSTOOD BY ALL AGE GROUPS AND NATIONALITIES 



CREDITS 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, 
COOPER-HEWITT, 
NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM 

BRUCE HANNAH 

TANYA H VAN COTT 

WARD SCHUMAKER 

TIM KUCYNDA 




Products and environments designed with everyone in mind are the 
goal of "universal design." "Unlimited by Design" was the first mu- 
seum exhibition of universally- designed residential interiors, recre- 
ation systems, and consumer products. Focusing on the best solutions 
for universal access, including greater safety, increased comfort, case 
of operation, and adaptability to different situations, the exhibition 
comprised full-scale, interactive environments as well as hands-on 
displays of products. 

The exhibition followed accessible design guidelines in its selec- 
tion of graphic elements and publications. Graphics showed that large 
type and accessible communication could be beautiful while greatlj 
increasing reader satisfaction. To complement the text panels with 
their exaggerated type si/cs. two illustrators created humorous and 
whimsical freehand illustrations to communicate concepts 
without words. The illustrations helped bridge genera- 
tional and cultural gaps by allowing viewers to respond 
w to the images whether or not they could read the exhibi- 
F*-^^/ lion lex I. They provided a lively spirit, energy, and humor 
to subject matter that otherwise inighl have seemed dr\ 
or pedantic. 

Advisors were an important pail of the exhibition's 
development. In addition to designers, the group included 
a geronlologisl, rehabililalion doctor, design historian, and consumer 
and disabilities advocates. Their diverse perspectives helped the 
museum create an exhibition thai engaged the general public on a 
variety of levels. 




54 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



"Henry Dreyfuss: Directing Design, 

The Industrial Designer and His Work 1929-1972" 



NEW YORK, NEWYORK 




To commemorate the life and work of Henry Dreyfuss, the pioneer 
American industrial designer, the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design 
Museum disseminated the most outstanding contents of its Dreyfuss 
archives via an exhibition, scholarly monograph, educational print 
pieces, and the Internet. The Dreyfuss project was seven years in the 
making and the first truly authoritative examination of any American 
industrial designer. 

The exhibition designers created a seamless quality between exhi- 
bition objects, text, and two-dimensional illustrations using both 
graphic and three-dimensional design. A sensitivity to and reflection 
of Dreyfuss's own designs were paramount in the design's aesthetic. 
Simply proportioned white panels displayed the ob- 
jects. Sketches by Dreyfuss retrieved from microfilm 
were silk screened directly on the walls to empha- 
size the breadth of his design process and reflect the 
design method of proceeding from ideas explored 
and communicated in two-dimensions to prototypes 
and final products in three-dimensions. 

Photo reproductions were sensitively designed to 
highlight the variety of scales Dreyfuss worked in, from telephone 
headsets to locomotives. Using the typeface Nobel, designed in 1929, 
the graphics conveyed a period feeling while emphasizing one of 
Dreyfuss's favorite geometric forms — the circle. The resultant texture 
of the exhibition was engaging to a general audience yet rich for the 
specialists, while at the same time being clear and informative. 



SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, 
COOPER-HEWITT, 
NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM 

RUSSELL FLINCHUM 

ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH OFFICE 

HAHN SMITH DESIGN 



JURY/ THE DESIGN OFTHE EXHIBITION BOOK AND PROMOTION MATERIALS FOR "HENRY DREYFUSS" 
COULD NOT BE MORE APPROPRIATE, CONSISTENT, ENTERTAINING, AND DELIGHTFUL. THE MATERIALS 
DO NOT DISAPPOINT; THEY EXCEED EXPECTATIONS. THIS IS THE BEST OF ALL WORLDS— GREAT DESIGN 
FOR GREAT SUBJECT MATTER, ENCOURAGED AND PRODUCED BY A GREAT CLIENT 





55 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



U.S. Senate Web Site 



WASHINGTON, DC 



The new Senate web site (www.senate.gov) humanizes the venerable 
institution of the U.S. Senate by making its everyday activities and 
rich history readily accessible to the public. Three objectives guided 
the designers in creating the site: (1) to provide a gateway to the home 
pages of individual Senators, (2) to make it easy to find legislative in- 
formation, and (3) to serve as a library for the vast historical, art, and 
architectural archives of the Senate. 

The multi-layered site provides a broad range of useful informa- 
tion, from the Senate's calendar of activities to information on the 
status of current bills and treaties. 

It also provides interesting historical facts, e.g., how many women 
have served in the Senate (answer: 27) and seeks to dispel several myths, 
e.g., the chandelier in the Senate rotunda used to hang in a brothel 
(fact: il first hung in the Maryland Theater in Baltimore). And, through 
die virtual tour— an interactive, user-friendly, comprehensive, and in- 
tegrated multimedia tour the viewer can explore the U.S. Capitol 
without ever leaving home. 



CREDITS 

U.S. SENATE, SERGEANT AT ARMS 
CIRCLE COM 



JURY/ LIKE MANY EFFECTIVE WEB SITES, THE U.S. SENATE SITE IS LOGICALLY 
ORGANIZED, EASYT0 NAVIGATE, AND FUNCTIONAL. WHILETHE DESIGN IS NOT 
INNOVATIVE, IT IS HONEST, EDUCATIONAL, AND EVEN HELPFUL. THE "VIRTUAL TOUR 
ASPECT HAS MUCH POTENTIAL TO BE EXPLORED. IT IS A NICE SURPRISE. 




56 



FEDERAL DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 
GRAPHIC DESIGN 



National Gallery of Art Web Site 



WASHINGTON, DC 



NM(«t: sjiion.il GjH«rv •( An - Mrcctny ot KjcMr lYogr jmi jnd teioiu 



< 1 A * 



•i^l 



3«r« 



National Directory of 

Teacher Program* and Resources in Art \tutmmt 



"■■HM.H | 'M-mrl,!,' S,.-,(,. . V-.Thtu TniiFf- 




Tiie Hsliontl Directory of Teacher Programs and Resources m Aft 
Mujmtw has been tompiW by th* Hiuotu) fUrry of Art. Wului/tm, foi 
e&itatursofalldisapbriestf the K- 1 J level, fui school ddrawtraloii. and 
for museum professionals 

Tbc objective ofuV&etfor? is 10 eK9urage*n4 fcfiuic teacher 
pmi'ipoUm n mu;e<xn propams fui educator* wul U> uo4e awarenar of 
the id mukMluupbEay <esuun.es avsijbtc. otlai fcce Ji tUaye. 4 art 
■ "tmsfcive 



I ".* '<- .H I'H-JE- 






Each day, the National Gallery of Art 
web site (www.nga.gov) has 23,000 
to 27,000 visitors — a testament to 
its success in making information 
about the Gallery's collections and 
programs available to as large an 
audience as possible. To accom- 
plish this result, the designers made 
access to the site possible with a 
minimal amount of computer 
equipment. The site allows the use 
of slow modems and small monitors, avoids gratuitous graphics, pro- 
vides text-based navigation, and offers alternatives to material that 
was designed for use with additional technical resources such as processing office 
browser plug-ins. Despite these constraints, the result is an elegant, GR 8 
graceful site that is easy to navigate. STEVE DIETZ 

The cornerstone of the web site is the Gallery's permanent collec- 
tion. More than 100,000 records form the core structure of the site. 
Pictures displayed in their frames with a drop shadow around each 
one give the visitor the feeling of seeing the works as they are exhib- 
ited on the walls of the Gallery. Interpretative text, conservation notes, 
exhibition history, provenance, bibliography, and a map showing the 
location of an object in the Gallery are available for most works. 

Because of the nature of the web, which relies on change to keep it 
fresh and alive, the Gallery site is continually updated and expanded. 



NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, 
EDITORS OFFICE AND DATA 



JURY/ THIS WEB SITE FEATURES A SIMPLE AND ELEGANT DESIGN, 
ALLOWING THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART TO REACH THE LARGEST 
POSSIBLE AUDIENCE. USERS CAN EXPERIENCE THE COLLECTION AT BOTH 
MACRO AND MICRO LEVELS. BECAUSE THE INTERFACE IS TEXT BASED, 
NAVIGATION IS QUICK AND EASY. 

Galiwy n* Art - van Gogh famtbmon 



~i ^ <* J* - ,* J* '''' 



{■•■■■ 



Van G„ih\ Van < ■ 







NiUC<p«: National GaHary or Art: N tura. Mann, rha Halfway (introflunion) 



,„-.t!.., . ,^T ...;^,„ 



J f-/" 



_j (^^' v, ^'•*• , •^ 



«•* from the Van Go*;!, Museum. Amsltrrfai 




A ■sU J-* :3 ^£J 




m*h. tv.jfaife? lan-itD 



!JV,^*:w^ it nm nf MuMti mr n nyw im t mil n m lwn 
wt yro Ow c.tfacfcacyl w»j 

set i Kiitit"^. Ali-ff.rv ranttl 



I »^^j| ~t\ 



57 




Presidential 1 H Awards 2000 



Previous 
Award -winning Projects 

The quadrennial Presidential Design Awards 
were established in 1983 to recognize and 
foster excellence in Federal design work. 

To date, 49 projects have received a 
Presidential Award for Design Excellence. 



58 



1984 



PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



CHARLES RIVER PROJECT 
Boston, MA 

Department of Defense, 
Army Corps of Engineers 

NEW PARTNERSHIP FOR 
RESTORING AMERICAN CITIES 
St. Paul, MN 
Department of Housing 
& Urban Development 

SCATTERED INFILL 
PUBLIC HOUSING 
Charleston, SC 
Department of Housing 
& Urban Development 

THE GARDENS 
San Mateo, CA 
Department of Housing 
& Urban Development 

HISTORIC PRESERVATION 

TAX INCENTIVES PROGRAM 

Nationwide 

Department of the Interior, 

National Park Service 

FRANKLIN COURT 
Philadelphia, PA 
Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 



LINN COVE VIADUCT 
Blue Ridge Parkway, NC 
Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 
Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 

INTERCITY BRIDGE 
Pasco/Kennewick, WA 
Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 

UNIGRID DESIGN PROGRAM 

Nationwide 

Department of the Interior, 

National Park Service 

VISUAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEM 
AND GRAPHIC WORKS 
Washington, DC 
National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 

TRANSPORTATION SYMBOL SIGNS 

Nationwide 

Department of Transportation 

ART-IN-ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM 

Nationwide 

General Services Administration 

THE SEATTLE FOOT 
Department of Veterans Affairs 





59 



1988 



PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL 
Washington, DC 
Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 
National Endowment for the Arts 

INTERNATIONAL ULTRAVIOLET 
EXPLORER PROGRAM 
Greenbelt, MD 
National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration, 
Goddard Space Flight Center 

SOUTHWEST CORRIDOR PROJECT 

Boston, MA 

Department of Transportation, 

Urban Mass Transportation Administration 

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART 
EXHIBITIONS & GRAPHICS 
Washington, DC 
National Gallery of Art 

O'HARE EXTENSION 

RAPIDTRANSIT LINE 

Chicago, IL 

Department of Transportation, 

Urban Mass Transportation Administration 

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE PLAN 
Washington, DC 
Pennsylvania Avenue 
Development Corporation 

BOXLEY VALLEY LAND-USE PLAN 
Harrison, AR 

Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 

SUNSHINE SKYWAY BRIDGE 
Tamp-St. Petersburg, FL 
Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 

DELAWARE AQUEDUCT RENOVATION 
Lackawaxen, PA, and Minisink Ford, NY 
Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 

EAST HUNTINGTON BRIDGE 
Huntington, WV, and Proctorville, OH 
Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 




60 



1992 



PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



MER ROUGE VILLAS 
Mer Rouge, LA 
Department of Agriculture, 
Farmers Home Administration 



BLUE HERON COAL MINING CAMP 
Big South Fork National River and 
Recreation Area, KY 
Department of Defense, 
Army Corps of Engineers 

OLD FAITHFUL INN REHABILITATION 
Yellowstone National Park, WY 
Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 



BENDWAY WEIRS 
ONTHE MISSISSIPPI RIVER 
Department of Defense, 
Army Corps of Engineers 

KEYS AND LOCKS INTHE COLLECTION 
OFTHE COOPER-HEWITT MUSEUM 
New York, NY 
Smithsonian Institution, 
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum 

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART 
EXHIBITION DESIGN, 1984-1990 
Washington, DC 
National Gallery of Art 

ARCTIC DATA INTERACTIVE 
Department of the Interior, 
Geological Survey 

EGIS EXPLOSIVES DETECTOR 
Department of State 
Department of Transportation, 
Federal Aviation Administration 





January 

1979(SMMR) 




| Sr-»» C»^ Bit | 

bunch 




^T 



O AE 
DD 



a 


►► 


Ml 





61 



1995 



PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR DESIGN EXCELLENCE 



FOCUS: HOPE 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES 

Detroit, MI 

Department of Commerce, 

Economic Development Administration 

BYRON WHITE U.S. COURTHOUSE 

Denver, CO 

General Services Administration 

U.S. HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Washington, DC 

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum 

U.S. HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM 
PERMANENT EXHIBITION 
Washington, DC 
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum 

DOUBLE ARCH BRIDGE OF 
THE NATCHEZ TRACE PARKWAY 
Franklin, TN 

Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 
Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 

INTERSTATE 90 COMPLETION PROJECT 
Seattle, WA 

Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 

RIVER RELOCATION PROJECT 
Providence, RI 

Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 

COOPER-HEWITT, 
NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM 
New York, NY 
Smithsonian Institution, 
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum 

FDA FOOD LABEL 

Nationwide 

Department of Health and Human Services, 

Food and Drug Administration 




62 



NDEX / AWARDS 



B Y 



FEDERAL DEPARTMENT AND AGENCY 



Presidential Awards for Design Excellence listed in bold. 

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL 

Restoration of Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 
Washington, DC, p.38 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

CENSUS BUREAU 

National Data Processing Center, Bowie, Maryland, p. 10 

U.S. Census 2000 Form, p.48 

NATIONAL OCEANIC & ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION 
National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida, p. 35 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 

DEPARTMENT OFTHE AIR FORCE 

U.S. Air Force Design Awards Program, p.49 

DEPARTMENT OFTHE ARMY 

Hastings Groundwater Remediation Project, 
Hastings, Nebraska, p.45 

Life Support for Trauma and Transport, p. 46 

San Antonio River Flood Control Tunnel, 
San Antonio, Texas, p. 44 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

"Growing Up Drug Free: A Parent's Guide to Prevention," p. 52 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

Medical Guidelines, p. 53 

DEPARTMENT OFTHE INTERIOR 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 

Vincent E. McKelvey Federal Building, 
Menlo Park, California, p. 32 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, Washington, DC, p. 20 

Park Cultural Landscapes Program, p. 22 

Rehabilitation of the James A. Garfield House, 
Mentor, Ohio, p. 40 

Women's Memorial Education Center, Arlington, Virginia, p. 37 

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 

FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION 

Clark Bridge, Alton, Illinois, p.42 

Interstate 70, Glenwood Canyon, Colorado, p. 16 

Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge Design Competition, 
Alexandria, Virginia, p. 43 



FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION 

Grand Central Terminal, New York, New York, p. 14 

Metropolitan Transportation Authority Arts for Transit, 
New York, New York, p. 47 

Westside MAX Light Rail, Portland, Oregon, p.24 

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 

U.S. Census Bureau National Data Processing Center, 
Bowie, Maryland, p. 10 

U.S. Courthouse, Boston, Massachusetts, p. 33 

U.S. Courthouse Plaza, Minneapolis, Minnesota, p.41 

U.S. Court of Appeals, San Francisco, California, p39 

U.S. Customs and Immigration Center, Rainbow Bridge, 
Niagara Falls, New York, p. 36 

U.S. Port of Entry, Calexico, California, p. 12 

U.S. Port of Entry, Point Roberts, Washington, p. 34 

Vincent E. McKelvey Federal Building, 
Menlo Park, California, p. 32 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

Medical Guidelines, p. 53 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 

JET PROPULSION LABORATORY 
Mars Pathfinder Mission, p.18 

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS 

The Mayors' Institute on City Design, 
Washington, DC, p.26 

"Voice of the Homeless," Los Angeles, California, p. 51 

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART 

National Gallery of Art Web Site, Washington, DC, p. 57 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

COOPER-HEWITT, NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM 

"Henry Dreyfuss: Directing Design, The Industrial Designer 
and His Work 1929-1972," New York, New York, p.55 

"Unlimited by Design," New York, New York, p. 54 

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART 
American Photographs: The First Century, p. 50 

U.S. SENATE 

U.S. Senate Web Site, Washington, DC, p. 56 



63 



CREDITS 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



The photographs in this awards book may not be used without 
the permission of the photographer or organization listed. 



Page* 10- 1 1 

Paul Warchol Photography 

Pages 12-13 

Robert Peck Photography 

Pages 14-15 

James Rudnick Photography 

Page 18 
NASA/JPLVCaltech 

Page 19 

California Institute of Technology 

Page 20 

Left to right, top to bottom 

Lawrence Halprin 

Dee Mullen 

Dan Morris 

Dan Morris 

Page 21 
Jessse Stovall 

Page 22-23 

National Park Service, 

Park Cultural Landscapes Program 

Page 24 
Top to bottom 
C. Bruce Forster 
C. Bruce Forster 
Tim Jewett 

Page 25 

Eckert & Eckert 

Page 26 

Paul Schlismann with persmission 

of Hitchcock Design Group 

Page 27 

Top 

Robert A.M. Stern Architects 



Page 32 

David Wakely Photography 

Page 33 

Steve Rosenthal 

Page 34 

James F. Housel, Photographer 

Page 35 
Mike Sinclair 

Page 36 
Michael Moran 

Page 37 

Weiss/Manfredi Architects 

Page 38 

The Architect of the Capitol 

Page 39 
Abby Sad in 

Page 40 

Gary Quesada 

Hedrich-Blessing 

Page 41 

Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, PC 

Page 42 
Terry Farmer 

Page 43 

Potomac Crossing Consultants 

Page 44 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

San Antonio River Authority 

Page 45 

URS Greiner Wodward Clyde 

Page 46 

Integrated Medical Systems, [nc. 



Page 47 
Top to bottom 
Mike Kamber 
Mike Kamber 
David Lubarsky 

Page 48 
Gloria Baker 

Page 49 

3D/International 
Giles Design Group 

Page 50 

Eugene Young 

Mildred Baldwin 

National Museum of American Art 

Page 51 

BJ Krivanek Art + Design 

Page 54 

Bill Jacobson 

Page 55 
Matt Flynn 

Page 60 

Top 

Hedrich-Blessing 

Page 61 

Top 

Andy Beck 

Bottom right 

Timothy Hursley 

Page 62 

Top 

Balthazar Korab 

Middle 

Timothy Hursley 

Hot to in left 

Michael Barber Architecture 




Presidential IE O \\\ards20oo 



The quadrennial Presidential Design Awards are the only 
Governmentwide recognition of excellence in Federal design. 
The awards program is administered jointly by the General 
Services Administration and the National Endowment for 
the Arts under the Federal Design Improvement Program. 

For further information: 

Presidential Design Awards 
Office of the Chief Architect (PND) 
General Services Administration 
1800 F Street, NW Room 3341 
Washington, DC 20405 
202-501-1888 



64